Monthly Archives: February 2013

Agile Software Development In 5 Minutes

I have released a course on Pluralsight called Agile Fundamentals that talks about Agile Software Development in detail.

I have also written an article on Common Agile Misconceptions.

Recently, I have been doing lots of recruitment for .NET consultants. Each of the CV’s we receive all stress that they are experienced in working in agile development shops. This is great. We are an agile development company so these people sounds like a great fit.

Agile Software Development - Embracing Change

Agile Software Development – Embracing Change

So we get them into an interview and ask them, ‘What does agile mean?’, ‘How do you know if your team is truly agile?’ It’s at that point we get the standard list of responses:

  • We do Test Driven Development.
  • Daily stand-ups.
  • We pair program.
  • We use continuous integration.
  • We use SCRUM, KanBan, XP etc.
  • Use work in iterations.
  • We use story points.
  • We calculate team velocities.

These answers are all well and good, but they don’t describe what an agile team is. These are all just facilitators to being agile. What’s even worse is that these interviewees seem to have not heard of the agile manifesto.

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Book Review : The Architecture of Open Source Applcations

I am a bit of a book worm, especially with technical books. I love nothing more than to extend my knowledge on my craft. I wanted to let you know about a book that I have been reading recently that is absolutely fascinating. The book is called, the Architecture of Open Source Applications.

The idea behind the book is simple. If you were an architect constructing buildings, you wouldn’t do so without studying how other buildings are constructed. The premise is the same for software. As a software developer / solutions architect, how can you design applications without first studying how other applications are designed and built? That is exactly what this book does.  This book covers 25 open source applications and discusses how they were built and designed.

Amazon.com Paperback | Kindle

Amazon.co.uk Paperback | Kindle

Architecture of Open Source Applications

Architecture of Open Source Applications

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Unit Test Coverage, Code Metrics, and Static Code Analysis

Back in a previous article I discussed a process I now do with my team to conduct code reviews. The idea is to drive up code quality by better use of the tools available to developers. By focusing on the tools and process that we follow to develop code we can collectively drive up quality. The basic process was as follows:

  • Get the code out of source control fresh.
    • Does it build? Yes then continue, No then stop the code review.
  • Run the unit tests.
    • Do they run and all pass? Yes then continue, No then stop the code review.
  •  Check the unit test code coverage.
    • Is the coverage around >60%? Yes then continue, No then stop the code review unless there is a good excuse for the coverage that the review team are happy with.
  •  Check the code metrics (Cyclomatic Complexity and Maintainability Index)
    • Are the metrics within agreed boundaries? Yes then continue, No then stop the code review.
  •  Run the static code analysis against the agreed rule set?
    • Are there any warnings / errors? Yes then stop the code review, No then continue.
  • Once you get to this point, the development practices have been followed and you can proceed to review the actual code.

All of the tools I discussed above are available as standard to developers who use Visual Studio Enterprise Edition, except Resharper/CodeRush etc.

Unit Test Coverage

Whilst you are developing your software you should be writing tests to exercise that code. Whether you practice test driven development and write your tests first or write tests after the fact, you need a decent level of test coverage. This gives you a level of confidence that the code you are writing does what you expect it too. Also, it gives you a safety blanket when you need to refactor your code. If you make a change in one area, does it break something somewhere else? Unit tests should give you that answer.

The screen shot below, shows the Test Explorer view in Visual Studio 2012. From this view you can run all of your unit tests. As of Visual Studio 2012 Update 1, you can group you tests based on pass outcome, length of execution and project. Think of this view as your project health dashboard. If you have a good level of coverage and they are all green, then you can carry on developing. If you have any red tests then you need to work out why and fix them. Don’t let this view lead you into a false sense of security though. You still need to write tests to a decent level of coverage and ensure you are testing the right things.

Visual Studio 2012 - Test Explorer

Visual Studio 2012 – Test Explorer

You can check your test coverage very easily in Visual Studio. First you can click the little drop down ‘Run’ menu in the Test Explorer, or you can open the ‘Test’ menu in Visual Studio, and then open up the ‘Analyse Test Coverage’ and select ‘All Tests’. This will give you a view similar to below.

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