Monthly Archives: July 2017

Life at a Start-up : My Next Chapter Starts Today

Today I start the next chapter in the Life at a Startup. I have made the decision to leave Buying Butler and RightIndem to go solo. I have been contemplating this for a while, but I have now decided to make the jump. So what does this mean? What will I be doing? Well, lots of things. First I want to spend more time of making Pluralsight courses, speaking and training. I also have an idea for a small tech startup that I want to explore, so I will focusing a lot of time on that too as I am pretty excited by it.  I have been preparing for it for a while, and now is the time to become a free agent.

Last Day in Office

Last Day in Office

That doesn’t mean the life at a startup series is dead. It will just be a different startup that I talk about.  Well, a mix of startup and the trials and tribulations of working from home. I am not ready to reveal what the startup idea is yet, but over time I will do that once I have explored it more, so not too much detail in this post, other than I am taking a different path, and a path that means I am my own boss, working on the things I want to work on.

Part of me is sad to leave Buying Butler. I have helped hand pick a great team, and I am leaving them on very friendly terms. Nothing negative in the slightest. I have made many friends there and I will be in touch with many of them.

More soon to follow soon. I have a new desk at home to setup 🙂

I will follow up again next week with my experiences of remote working, maintaining focus and much more.

Life at a Start-up : Structuring teams for growth (NDC Oslo Talk Video)

As well as being the head of development for Buying Butler and RightIndem, part of my role is speaking at technology conferences around the world. I speak about many subjects around technology, but I do this as a representative of the company, which helps us spread the word about what we are doing.

In June I went to Oslo in Norway for the NDC conference where I spoke about restructuring teams using techniques that were first described by Spotify. We have tried to adopt something similar in our company, but as with everything Spotify’s technique is not one size fits all. The main message from my talk is that you have to adapt the model to fit your own companies structure and requirements.

In the talk, I discuss how Spotify have done it, and also how we have tried to implement it.  The key difference is that Spotify is a B2C (Business to Consumer) company and we are a B2B (Business to Business) company.

I am thinking of writing a more in-depth article on this, but for now, I will leave you with my talk from the conference. It is the first time I have done the talk, and it seemed to go down very well with people. I had lots of people come and see me afterward to ask me about it in more detail.