Category Archives: Code Quality

Code Metrics and Static Code Analysis Talk

The Perils of Not Writing Good Unit Tests?

The Perils of Not Writing Good Unit Tests?

Yesterday I did a new talk on Code Metrics and Static Code Analysis at my usergroup Derbyshire DotNet. The talk seemed to go down well and there were some interesting discussions about code quality and the meaning of quality to people in different industries.

I have made the slides available from this link to anyone that wants them for reference.

Microsoft Article : Using Code Metrics to Guide Code Reviews

Using Code Metrics to Guide Code Reviews

Using Code Metrics to Guide Code Reviews

This week I have published a new article on the Microsoft Developer Blog. The article is called “Using Code Metrics to Guide Code Reviews” and talks about how you can use the code metrics in Visual Studio as a way to run a code review to stimulate discussions about code quality.

The article also takes a look at the NDepend tools and how they can give you an ever deeper insight into what’s happening in your code.

Continuous Testing with NCrunch

Disclaimer: I currently do not own or have been given a license to NCrunch. I am forming my opinions of it based on the use of the 30 day evaluation license.

In this article I want to talk about a very useful tool called NCrunch. I have had a few people recommend the tool to me recently, so I thought I would check it out. I am glad I did. So, what is NCrunch? The description on their site explains this nicely.

Continuous Testing with NCrunch

Continuous Testing with NCrunch

NCrunch is an automated concurrent testing tool for Visual Studio .NET. It intelligently runs automated tests so that you don’t have to, and gives you a huge amount of useful information about your tested code, such as code coverage and performance metrics, inline in your IDE while you type.

On reading that I first though, hmm, well doesn’t visual studios test explorer do that, and it does, but this tools goes a step further. In essence NCrunch executes tests in the background whilst you work giving you continuous feedback. Initially I thought that’s not really such a big deal. One of the projects I am working in has 690 unit tests and because they are true unit tests, as in they don’t hit databases or external resources, then they only take 20 seconds or so to run. Even though this is the case you still get into the compile, run the tests, check the results, fix or carry on loop.

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Using NDepend to Analyse the Quality of your Code

Disclaimer : My license for NDepend was provided free by Patrick Smacchia at NDepend. This license was not given to me in return for a good review. The article below is based purely on my own observations and use of NDepend.

A while back I published a couple of articles on Structured Code Reviews:

Structured Code Reviews and Code Quality

Unit Test Coverage, Code Metrics, and Static Code Analysis

In these articles I discussed a code reviewing process aimed at sharing knowledge and increasing code quality in your team. In these articles I discussed using the tools already available to you in Visual Studio 2012, like the Unit Test Runner, Code Metrics, and Static Code Analysis.

Using NDepend to Analyse the Quality of your Code

Using NDepend to Analyse the Quality of your Code

In this article I want to expand on the tools available by looking at a 3rd party tool called NDepend. So, what is NDepend? First let’s look at the description from their website.

Make your .NET Code Beautiful with NDepend

NDepend is a Visual Studio tool to manage complex .NET code and achieve high Code Quality. With NDepend, software quality can be measured using Code Metrics, visualized using Graphs and Treemaps, and enforced using standard and custom Rules.

Hence the software design becomes concrete, code reviews are effective, large refactoring are easy and evolution is mastered.

Essentially NDepend is an analysis tool that really allows you to dig deep into the structure and quality of your code. You may want to do this for various reasons. You may want to routinely keep an eye on the quality of your project, or you may have to get under the skins of a large piece of legacy code so that you can refactor it.

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All Your Mocks are Evil!!

In unit testing, all mocks are evil! Now there’s a controversial statement to start a blog post with, but let me explain. I am writing this from my own experience as a software developer and a leader of software developers. This is the sort of thing that software religious wars are made of, so if you agree, or disagree, I would love for you to share your thoughts in the comments.

evil

I think Mocking libraries, although very powerful, can enable developers to over complicate their unit tests. Unit tests should be short and easy to understand. I have lost count of the times where I have seen a developer mock out more than they need to because of excessive class coupling in their code. Just because you can mock out any object doesn’t mean that you should and avoid reducing excessive coupling.

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Agile Software Development In 5 Minutes

I have released a course on Pluralsight called Agile Fundamentals that talks about Agile Software Development in detail.

I have also written an article on Common Agile Misconceptions.

Recently, I have been doing lots of recruitment for .NET consultants. Each of the CV’s we receive all stress that they are experienced in working in agile development shops. This is great. We are an agile development company so these people sounds like a great fit.

Agile Software Development - Embracing Change

Agile Software Development – Embracing Change

So we get them into an interview and ask them, ‘What does agile mean?’, ‘How do you know if your team is truly agile?’ It’s at that point we get the standard list of responses:

  • We do Test Driven Development.
  • Daily stand-ups.
  • We pair program.
  • We use continuous integration.
  • We use SCRUM, KanBan, XP etc.
  • Use work in iterations.
  • We use story points.
  • We calculate team velocities.

These answers are all well and good, but they don’t describe what an agile team is. These are all just facilitators to being agile. What’s even worse is that these interviewees seem to have not heard of the agile manifesto.

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Unit Test Coverage, Code Metrics, and Static Code Analysis

Back in a previous article I discussed a process I now do with my team to conduct code reviews. The idea is to drive up code quality by better use of the tools available to developers. By focusing on the tools and process that we follow to develop code we can collectively drive up quality. The basic process was as follows:

  • Get the code out of source control fresh.
    • Does it build? Yes then continue, No then stop the code review.
  • Run the unit tests.
    • Do they run and all pass? Yes then continue, No then stop the code review.
  •  Check the unit test code coverage.
    • Is the coverage around >60%? Yes then continue, No then stop the code review unless there is a good excuse for the coverage that the review team are happy with.
  •  Check the code metrics (Cyclomatic Complexity and Maintainability Index)
    • Are the metrics within agreed boundaries? Yes then continue, No then stop the code review.
  •  Run the static code analysis against the agreed rule set?
    • Are there any warnings / errors? Yes then stop the code review, No then continue.
  • Once you get to this point, the development practices have been followed and you can proceed to review the actual code.

All of the tools I discussed above are available as standard to developers who use Visual Studio Enterprise Edition, except Resharper/CodeRush etc.

Unit Test Coverage

Whilst you are developing your software you should be writing tests to exercise that code. Whether you practice test driven development and write your tests first or write tests after the fact, you need a decent level of test coverage. This gives you a level of confidence that the code you are writing does what you expect it too. Also, it gives you a safety blanket when you need to refactor your code. If you make a change in one area, does it break something somewhere else? Unit tests should give you that answer.

The screen shot below, shows the Test Explorer view in Visual Studio 2012. From this view you can run all of your unit tests. As of Visual Studio 2012 Update 1, you can group you tests based on pass outcome, length of execution and project. Think of this view as your project health dashboard. If you have a good level of coverage and they are all green, then you can carry on developing. If you have any red tests then you need to work out why and fix them. Don’t let this view lead you into a false sense of security though. You still need to write tests to a decent level of coverage and ensure you are testing the right things.

Visual Studio 2012 - Test Explorer

Visual Studio 2012 – Test Explorer

You can check your test coverage very easily in Visual Studio. First you can click the little drop down ‘Run’ menu in the Test Explorer, or you can open the ‘Test’ menu in Visual Studio, and then open up the ‘Analyse Test Coverage’ and select ‘All Tests’. This will give you a view similar to below.

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