Removing Mental Roadblocks from Your Work

If you found this useful, then you might also like my book on overcoming procrastination called, A Gentle Introduction to Beating Procrastination and Getting Focused, which is available as an eBook and paperback on Amazon.

Being creative in the workplace is not rocket science; it’s an achievable feat. Creativity in the workplace does more good to you than harm. It helps you make progressive flows in your work, enhances outputs and brings fulfillment to your work.  As profitable as creativity in workplaces is, some forces will readily prevent you from being creative in your work. These forces are called mental roadblocks.

Removing mental roadblocks from  your work
Removing mental roadblocks from your work

Mental roadblocks make it impossible for you to explore your creativity to the fullest, thereby hindering your optimum performance at the workplace. They also hinder your brain from making the right-thinking connections necessary for creativity. For you to have increased productivity through creativity, you have to deal with mental roadblocks. Dealing with mental roadblocks goes beyond the daily performance of routine tasks. In squarely dealing with mental roadblocks, you must face both the external and internal aspects of productive creativity. If you neglect the internal aspects in pursuits of the external aspects, you stay in the same spot of non-performance for a very long time. Productive creativity entails you deal with the internal issues – the mental roadblocks.

We shall travel this journey of dealing with mental roadblocks that hamper your productivity and creativity at work. When you deal with these mental roadblocks, nothing will ever slow you down from putting in your all and getting the best in your workplace.

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Life at a Start-up : Hiring Developers

In a previous post I said that at Buying Butler and RightIndem we have been growing quite rapidly across the board, but in this post I want to talk a little about our hiring process for developers. Hiring good people is hard and Me, and our CTO Steve Weston, have worked at many companies that have had horrible hiring processes, so we are keen to not replicate some of these other companies.

Interview Preparation
Interview Preparation

When we hire developers, and if you are due to interview with me and have landed on this post as part of your research (hello), there are 4 main things we are looking for in a developer. These are

  • Have you got the base skills to come in and be productive straight away?
  • How passionate are you about software development?
  • What is your approach to learning and picking up new skills and technologies?
  • Will you be a good cultural fit for the company?

By knowing this bit of insight you are not cheating our recruitment process, but by understanding these 4 areas you will be in a position to wow us in the interview. Lets cover these off one by one.

Is Being a Manager Right for Me – Techorama Talk

I have just delivered a talk at the Belgium software development conference Techorama. My talk was called Is Being a Manager Right for Me. This talk is a shortened version of my First Pluralsight course called Developer to Manager.

If you want a copy of the slides, they can be found here.

Is being a manager right for me by Stephen Haunts at Techorama
Is being a manager right for me by Stephen Haunts at Techorama

The purpose of the talk is to help developer decide if being a manager s right for them. The talk sets out to set their expectations by talking about career paths, the difference between management and leadership and many core skills that a manager or leader needs.

The talk went very well and I had a good sized audience. I will do a fuller write up of the conference when I am back from the conference.

Different Perspectives : Developer to Manager

Recently a company called Plan.IO, which is a company that produces online project management software wrote a blog article about becoming a manager from a software developer background.

Developer to Manager
Developer to Manager

I was interviewed as part of this article and provided one of the perspectives out of 3. It’s an interesting ready, so I recommend heading over there. It is a subject I care a lot about as it is a jump I made my self. I wrote an article on this very subject back in 2014, and it was also the subject of my first Pluralsight course called Developer to Manager.

Practical Tips for Talking at Usergroups and Conferences Part 1

Since becoming a Pluralsight author in July 2014, I have been working toward increasing my own personal brand. Part of this has been about getting out into the programming community and talking at User groups. I did my first talk in January of this year and have since done many talks. I was initially quite nervous about public speaking but I have enjoyed the process very much and I intend to increase the amount of talks I do in 2016.

Stephen Haunts talking at the Leeds Sharp Usergroup
Stephen Haunts talking at the Leeds Sharp Usergroup

I have learnt many things along the way whilst preparing and delivering talks so I thought I would write this post to talk about what I have learnt. If you have experience in this area and also have your own tips from public speaking it would be great to hear them in the comments for this post.

I have split this into two posts. Tips for before you deliver your talk, and the actual delivery itself.

Your Rights in the Workplace

In this article I want to cover what some of your rights are in the workplace. With this I don’t mean things like the right to regular breaks and access to coffee etc. What I mean is your professional rights when working on projects in a team, and these rights are very important if you are ever in a position of conflict with another person on your team. It is in times of conflict that rights are very important, so they are described below from that perspective.

Your Rights in the Workplace
Your Rights in the Workplace

The rights are:

  • To be treated with respect. No matter what you dispute is, you all deserve to be treated with respect no matter what the outcome is.
  • To hold my views and have them heard. You have the right to an opinion just as the other people in a conflict do, and it is all your right to express these viewpoint as long as you treat each other with respect.

The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us

In my post on Retaining Software Developers, I had a number of really good comments to the post. One of the comments made reference to a fantastic video about the Truth about what really motivates us.

This video is an animated short which summarises a longer video by Dan Pink. If you are a software developer or a lead of developers, then I really recommend watching this video.