View of the London Eye and River Thames from Westminster Bridge.

Weekly Update – Week Commencing 9th May 2022

This week I have been at a conference in London, where I stayed in Westminster. I have been quite productive all week with my writing. Being away for a week, and having a change of scenary is great for productivity.

For my debut novel, Diary of a Martian, I drafted two chapters, and completed an initial revision to another chapter. These chapters mark the end of the second act in the story, a nice milestone to reach.

View of the London Eye and River Thames from Westminster Bridge.
View of the London Eye and River Thames from Westminster Bridge.

I spent some time mapping chapters for the last act. I now have placeholder chapters in place that takes me to the end of the book. To get an idea of my word count, I generated 2250 words of Lorum Ipsum that I added into each of those chapters. This represents my average word count per chapter. With this in place, it predicts my final word count will be just over 80,000 words; I have some cutting to do at the end. I ideally want my finished book to be under 70,000 words, closer to 60,000 if possible. I’m not worrying about cutting words at the moment, but it gives me something to think about as I prepare to kill some darlings.

I also wrote another chapter for my writing craft non-fiction book. This is a book about my thoughts and feelings about trying to write a debut novel. I am feeling great about this book. I’m currently around 15,000 words into this manuscript. It is a handy project to have in progress. When I get stuck on plot details for Diary of a Martian, I can switch over to this book to keep me productive.

Another writing project I am commissioned to write is a non-fiction instructional book for a publisher called PacktPub. I’m not allowed to talk too much about that book yet. I am halfway through the manuscript, and I completed about 3000 words for it this week.

A productive week of writing, considering I was at a conference most of the time. I don’t have any travel plans for a while now, but it was nice to get into different surroundings and meet lots of people in real meat-space, as opposed to online with Zoom calls. The world now truly feels like it has returned to normal.

A view of Porto City and the River Douro

Weekly Update – Week Commencing 2nd May 2022

I have found other writers who publish a weekly progress update, and I find it interesting to read, even if I am not immediately familiar with their work. I thought I would start doing the same. It is a great way to keep myself accountable. If I write too little, the update will be boring.

A view of Porto City while I was travelling the other week.

I have had a productive writing week. Last week I was in Porto (Portugal), presenting at a conference, and I got back home on the Sunday. I started the week by reviewing some blog posts I wrote while I was away. 

I wrote another chapter for Diary of a Martian; just under 2000 words. I performed a light edit on this chapter so that it is quite clean. I am thrilled with it. I am approaching a very action packed part of the book, and the current chapters contain a lot of rich world-building. 

The most challenging part of these chapters is the principal antagonist is present in the scene, but nobody knows they are the baddie. It is a mystery, as the antagonist is someone in a position of power. I have been trying to drop subtle hints about the person in the story; just subtle mannerisms. It’s been fun to do, but I sometimes doubt myself and wonder if I am giving anything away, or not being subtle enough. I hear from a lot of writers that doubting yourself, and motives, is normal, so I am putting it down to being part of the process.

I am also working on a new non-fiction book, which I will talk about in more detail this week. I completed about 3000 words for this project and I am feeling good it. The book is a creative writing non-fiction book, and I am considering sharing the unedited chapters on this blog to solicit feedback. I will be self-publishing the book, so I don’t need to worry about how a publisher feels about me posting them. I thought it would be fun to write it in the open.

Next week, I am presenting at a conference in London, so I will be away most of the week. While away, I am hoping to get a lot of writing done. I find work trips very productive. Like a true introvert, I enjoy being holed up in the hotel writing in the evening. Not every evening. I am not completely anti-social, but I intend to get at least one more chapter for Diary of a Martian completed.

The Joy of Writing Fiction

I have been a professional writer for many years in the non-fiction space. When I was younger, I had a desire to write fiction, but at the time I never had the confidence to start, so I put it off. It wasn’t until the pandemic happened, and I needed to channel my attention into something new to keep me sane. Being locked in with your family, and trying to home-school, as well as do your day job work was tough; I’m sure many people will relate to this. I needed something I could work on as a distraction. I could spend as little or as much time as necessary to see results. Hello creative writing.

I had lots of story ideas, and I really liked the idea of writing for children, so with that in mind I started learning and writing; short stories to start with. I took online classes with platforms like LinkedIn Learning, Masterclass, and The Great Courses. I also embarked on a nine-month creative writing class by applying to take the Faber Academy – Write a Novel course; I will write a review of that soon as I just completed the course.

With all this learning and story writing, I reflected on why I have fallen in love with creative writing so much. So, in true internet blog form, I have written a list post.  In no particular order.

1. Something I Can do By Myself

If the pandemic was good at one thing, it was making sure you couldn’t do anything with other people, unless you wanted to sit for hours on a Zoom call, which I didn’t. The great thing about writing is it left you alone with a word-processor and your own thoughts. That’s all you need. Okay, you work with editors, proofreaders, beta readers later, but, for the vast majority of the creative work, getting your first draft and revision completed, it’s just you.

As a self-confessed introvert, that suits me just fine. I am not shy; I love talking to people, but I recharge my mental batteries by being alone, and what better activity to do alone: writing.

Throughout lockdown, when the daily homeschooling finished, and I had struggled through my day job work, I would relax and work on short stories. Even if it was only half an hour. That private writing time, with my headphones on, allowed me to reset from a hard day. Would I say it was a kind of therapy? Yeah, sure, that works. That leads us on to point number two.

2. Relaxing and Calming

After a busy day home-schooling and working, I found the simple act of creative writing to be calming and relaxing. I was working on short stories with no particular agenda. There were no editors waiting for them. No pressure from publishers. It was just for my benefit. Will I release those stories? Maybe; I could put them out into a small collection for my own gratification. But there were no expectations. I could write a story and have fun with it.

I like to write middle-grade fiction, so I aimed my stories at children. Having two kids in the house, a daughter (now thirteen), and a son (now ten), also meant I had a small audience. I nervously gave my kids the stories, as they both read before bed, and they loved them. Quite how honest their reaction was is anyone’s guess, as family members will always be nice when they read your work. But they appeared to enjoy the stories. We discussed the plots, and they even gave me some useful feedback from a kids’ perspective to improve them. That was a lot of fun.

3. Doesn’t Require a Lot of Equipment

In my career (training and public speaking) I have often taught people that working within limitations and constraints forces you to be creative with what you have available. This is certainly true with writing. All you really need as a modern writer is a computer and a word-processor. You don’t even need a fancy computer. An old hand-me-down works too.

If you really want to talk about limitations, then you don’t actually need a computer. You can produce work that is just as fun to read with a pad and pencil as anyone with the latest Apple Super-Duper-MacBook-Pro.

If you use a computer, then you can even get away with not paying for any writing software—legally, of course. If you own a Mac, then it comes with Pages, Apples own word processor, and it’s pretty good. You can also download Libre Office, which is a free of cost, and an open source equivalent to Microsoft Office. LibreWriter is a very capable Microsoft Word equivalent, and it won’t cost you a penny. If you are a fan of Google, then you can use their Google Docs, cloud based word processor. So many great options.

4. Learning the Craft is Fun

Whenever I embark on any new hobby or interest, I am the sort of person who has to learn all I can about the subject. I find learning about something just as much fun as doing the activity itself, and creative writing it no exception. As I already mentioned, I took several online self-paced classes, and also undertook the nine month Faber Academy writing program. All of which I enjoyed immensely.

I have also bought and read many books on fiction writing and writing craft. It is so satisfying to read about another writer’s experience, and see how they tackle writing a book, even if you don’t like their approach. It is all valuable information. 

During lockdown, I upped my walking, as that was pretty much all you could do if you left the house, so I sought podcasts to listen to. My favourite was a British show called Writer’s Routine, where the host interviews a writer every episode to talk about their routine and process for writing a book. I started with the latest episode and worked my way backwards through the catalog. I listened to every episode. I haven’t done that with any other show. Super Nerd or what!!

5. Building Worlds in Your Imagination

Now to the writing itself. Fiction writing is partly about world-building, especially in science fiction and fantasy writing. It is so much fun designing a fictional world, and revealing it gradually on the page so that the reader can see a vivid image of your creation in their minds-eye. 

I set my first novel in the future on an established Mars colony. You can just imagine the amount of fun I am having with that. With the story set in the future, I can take liberties and come up with some really cool technology. World-building through writing can be powerful.

When I was on the Faber Academy course, I was reading one submission from a classmate. We had to read and critique each other’s work. In the extract she posted, there were a few lines that described a mechanical bird flying down and landing on someone’s shoulder. 

As I was writing up my feedback, I mentioned that in two sentences; she conjured up a vivid image in my mind that would take a team of visual effect specialists weeks, if not months to achieve in a film. This is why writing fiction and world-building is so much fun. In a few sentences, you can get the same result in your mind with only a laptop that a movie might take ages to achieve. No disrespect to anyone who works in the movie business. Your work is amazing, but the simplicity and power of just a few short sentences struck me. Where else can you achieve so much impact?

6. Understanding People Better

Creative writing isn’t all world-building. The characters we write are just as important. I have found that by trying to write convincing and fun characters; I understand people better. If I write about a character that is trying to deal with a tough situation, I think about their predicament. I will do research to learn about their struggles, and I will use all this to bring a convincing character to life. I guess what I am saying is writing excellent characters improves your empathy towards others, and your understanding of the world.

Something I found very hard, and am paying particular attention to in my first novel, is making my characters multi-dimensional. Trying to add layers to their personality beyond what is just required to move the plot forward. It’s hard.

It’s probably the hardest aspect, but you just know when you get it right as you get a sense of what the character is like in your mind outside the plot. Your mind races with other situations and scenarios. I have added a lot of extra characterisations by having parts of the character’s personality just leap out at me. I guess this is what a lot of writers mean when they say their characters talk to them. I always thought that was rather cliched, but I think there is something to it now.

Also, if someone is mean to you in real life, you can get your revenge on the page. So, watch out. Muhahahaha

7. Improves Your Observational Skills

I have found that since writing fiction; I am better at observing people and their behaviours. A mum arguing with a toddler in the supermarket. A couple having an argument in the street. The old man who goes to the local park every day and sits on a bench feeding the ducks. All very mundane interactions, but when you write fiction, you pay attention. I have even started jotting some of these interactions down in a notebook, as you never know when they will form the inspiration for a story.

When I was walking my son to school, we were walking behind a dad and his two daughters. They were in an earlier school year to my son, but what I noticed was these two girls were identical twins. They looked completely identical in their appearance. The only difference was the colour of their jackets and a hairband on their heads.

As I was walking home after dropping my son off, I thought to myself, wouldn’t it be interesting if two girls used their identical looks as a superpower, and a way to cause mischief in school? That simple interaction led to me writing a short story called Operation Body Swap. A fun story about two cheeky young girls who hatch a plan. One simple interaction and subsequent thoughts when taking my son to school led to an entire story. Nice.

8. It’s Challenging

I would be lying if I said writing fiction was easy. It’s blooming hard. Much harder than non-fiction. With non-fiction, you spend a lot of time preparing a detailed outline, do all your research, and then write to the outline that you signed off with the publisher. It’s quite linear.

With fiction, you are trying to hold a cohesive plot together, along with subplots, and write interesting, multi-dimensional characters. I find this very hard, but that is something I like. I don’t want it to be easy. Easy is boring. Getting to the end of a draft and having a complete story that makes sense is satisfying.

Sometimes, when writing Diary of a Martian, I got stuck and wasn’t sure how to progress the plot, even though I had a fairly detailed beat sheet. I struggled with some details. Once I had solved those problems, I was left with a draft that I was happy with, and that feels great. I can’t wait to get my novel finished and through the revision stage as the thought of reading that final draft is exciting.

Like with everything in life, if something is challenging and difficult to achieve, you will appreciate the results so much more.

These are some of the main reasons I find writing such a joy. Do you agree with what I have said? Are there any other reason that you find writing a joy? If so, leave a comment and let me know.

Writer’s Block is Just an Excuse

Writer’s block is just an excuse to not write. It doesn’t really exist. After reading that you will either be nodding your head in agreement, or about to rage quit this blog; but give me a chance to share my thoughts first, as it’s just an opinion. Writers get stuck with what they are writing. It happens to me all the time, but I don’t consider it writer’s block. My muse hasn’t flown out the window. I am just stuck. 

A man struggling with writers block while huddled over a typewriter.
Portrait of frustrated man struggling with writers block over typewriter.

A few weeks ago, I was working on my debut middle-grade novel, Diary of a Martian. The story is about two-thirds done. I reached one section of the story where I knew where the characters had to end up, but I was struggling with a convincing way of getting them to that point. I wrestled with the problem for about an hour. Still no joy. I walked to see if the answer would come to me. It didn’t. I was stuck. Hmm, what to do? I could have pleaded that I had writers’ block, shut my laptop and do something else entirely, but that’s silly and not professional. 

I am a professional writer. I write for a living. Fiction may be new to me, but I have written a lot of non-fiction material. Instead I switched to something else; another writing project. I have another non-fiction book in the early stages that I am working on, so I carried on with that book. I had already outlined the next few chapters, so I knew what I needed to write. I carried on working on that non-fiction book for another four days solid. 

When doing the school run, and picking my son up, I left a little earlier and did a longer walk that ended up at the school; it was a sunny day. I loaded up a TV show score on my phone (the score for Picard series 1; the music is better than the show) and off I trot. Just over halfway through the walk, I had an epiphany. I figured out how to solve my plot problem. Was it the music that helped, or the walk? Don’t know. Why didn’t I think of this idea initially? Well, I was stuck, but now I had the answer. I pulled out my phone, loaded up the voice recorder and made a few audio notes. Satisfied, and with a big smile on my face, I finished the walk and picked up my son from school. 

That evening, I loaded up my novel in Scrivener, and finished writing the first draft for the section that was causing me issues. I wasn’t blocked. My muse may have been confused, but he chose to work on something else instead.

But Stephen, what if you had also become stuck with the non-fiction book at the same time? Then what would you do? Well, I have this blog, and a list of posts I want to write. I would work on one of those. It’s still writing. I have a collection of short stories that I have been working on. I could continue with one of those. I have quite a few other children’s novel ideas rattling around in my brain. I could make notes on those ideas; start their beat sheets, write profiles for the characters. I produce online training courses as part of my business. They are all scripted. I can carry on with the current course I am writing. There is always something to be getting on with.

There is a good way to summarise this:

Professional writers don’t get blocked. They get stuck, and then do something else temporarily.

Amateurs or hobby writers get stuck, think they are blocked, and then procrastinate.

I say choose the professional mindset. Just work on something else until you become unstuck. You don’t have a car mechanic claim to be blocked when fixing a car and then give up. They get help, or fix another car. Plumbers don’t get plumbers block. Professionals don’t claim <name of profession> block, they get stuck, try to fix the issue, or carry on with something else that needs doing for their profession, and come back to the problem later.

As with anything, this is just my opinion. You may agree, or you may disagree. That’s fine. Either way, leave a comment and let me know your take on writer’s block.

Kindle Addiction

I’m Stephen Haunts, and I’m a Kindleaholic. I keep buying books on the Kindle, and I can’t help it. I wasn’t as bad with paper books—OK; I bought a lot. The problem, if you can call it a problem, is that whenever anyone recommends a book they have read, I look it up on Amazon, and read the blurb and reviews. Before I know it, I have clicked the buy button and ten seconds later the book is sitting on my kindle ready to read. 

Amazon Kindle Paperwhite

Before I get accused of being an Amazon shill, the same issue exists with other e-readers, such as the Kobo or the Nook. The instant gratification of buying a book without having to go out anywhere is addictive. I started using a Kindle back in 2007, so I have built up an extensive library, which locks me into the Amazon ecosystem. Vendor lock-in is a bad thing, but damn; I just can’t help myself.

I also love physical books. I love the feel of them in my hands, and I love the smell—yes, I am a book sniffer. The problem is, I don’t enjoy getting rid of books I have finished reading. I don’t sell them or donate them. I see each completed book as a badge of honour, and I like to keep them on a bookcase. This becomes a problem when you read as much as I do. Books take up a lot of space.

I don’t know if I have a point with this post, apart from admitting I find the Kindle (or any other e-reader) addictive. A vast library of books, in my bag constantly. I now pretty much only read novels and non-fiction books in a digital format now. The only physical books I buy are those large, glossy, coffee table books. I’m a big fan of books about the art of movies, or about how movies are made. This type of book will always be better in physical form.

As a writer, the proliferation of the e-reader leaves me conflicted. I like my own books to be released as physical books. I always get that twang of excitement as I open a box of freshly printed books for the first time, but I know that realistically, I would probably buy the ebook version myself as a consumer. Ebooks are a problem for book shops. Only a few companies control the digital marketplaces for ebooks, locking out bookstores and smaller independents. I feel bad for them, but I still can’t stop buying my books digitally. Does that make me a bad person? Especially as a writer? Probably, but I seem to have become addicted to the digital crack cocaine that is the Kindle digital marketplace.

The Great Reset

Is there anyone here? Hello? It’s a little dusty in here; a semi-abandoned blog. Like that creepy cabin that your mum told you to stay away from. After Covid first showed its ugly teeth to the world, it became apparent that it wouldn’t go away quickly. Weeks turned into months. Months turned into years. The pressure of home schooling, social isolation, and general anxiety about the world meant a few of the plates I was trying to keep spinning, collapsed and were left abandoned. This blog was one of the fallen plates.

Creepy abandoned cabin.

Over the past few years, I have re-evaluated my creative priorities. To stay sane over the pandemic, I decided I wanted to leave lockdown better than when I went in. I wanted to learn something new, but if I’m honest, I was getting jaded with the pace of technology and software development; more on that in another post. A large part of my career still involves training, and I love doing it, but I wanted to learn something new.

I decided I would focus more on creative writing. I am already an experienced non-fiction writer with books that are both self-published and published through traditional publishers. I had dreamt of writing stories when I was younger. But I always felt intimidated by the process. I tackled that intimidation and start learning. I had lots of ideas. I just needed to learn about it. I won’t go into detail about that in this post; I’ll cover that soon, as I have been very productive.

This means the focus of this blog is changing. I contemplated whether to just blitz the content here and start again, but I decided against it. While the older articles, especially the technical articles, are not my main focus, I left some of them as they are still relevant. But this post is drawing a line under it, and I am starting again.

For anyone that comes to this blog who has read my non-fiction books, or watched my Pluralsight courses, hello and welcome. I am still writing those books. I am also still engaged in creating and maintaining content with Pluralsight. I love working with them. I’m very proud of that content, but this is going to be more personal. If that doesn’t interest you, then I won’t be offended if you leave and don’t come back. Thank you for following anything I do up to this point. 

If you decide to stick around, then I will write about the art and craft of creative writing for fiction and non-fiction. I will cover the technical aspects and talk about how I feel about the process. I will probably keep the posts fairly short, to ensure I actually write the blog posts. I’m considering turning this into a journal as well as an educational website. We’ll see. 

Anyway, welcome to the new stephenhaunts.com. I hope you like what I want to talk about and will follow along.

A Guide to Successful Remote Working and Working from Home

In a rapidly changing world, a few surprises in your daily flow are expected. Whether you are starting a new position, or your current job is changing scenarios, you might have found yourself as a new work-from-home employee. While it can seem like a dream to wear your pajamas or work from bed at first, things can become unproductive quickly if you’re not properly managing your time. 

Working remotely is more popular now than ever before. Technology has given us the opportunity to take workplaces we never thought possible. Do you want to work in your pajamas from your bed? Do you want to work on the beach while on vacation? Working remotely can make these things possible.

It seems like a dream to have opportunities like this, but in reality, it can become challenging quickly. While working from your pajamas or even on a beach seems luxurious, these are still experiences that you can’t do all the time. These beneficial scenarios can be reserved for sick days or times when you might not have much work, but for the most part, it’s best to stick to a structured schedule. 

For someone who is used to working in an office, or just someone lacking motivation in general, working from home isn’t the dream many believe it to be. 

Whether it’s barking dogs, energetic kids, or even another partner in the house working remotely that has you distracted, there are some saving graces. As a remote working newcomer, you don’t have to be afraid of your life being chaotic the entire time your home doubles as your office. 

Through the actionable advice I go over in this article, you can be not only efficient, but happy as you navigate your new “office.” Everyone is different, and what methods work for you might not for someone else. Go at your own pace and remember the most important thing is that you are getting your work done as needed. 

How to Give Constructive Criticism

Nearly 16,000 managers were surveyed in two separate studies by leadership development consultancies, one by Zenger and the other by Folkman. It might come as a shock to you that 44% of the managers responded that they find the act of giving feedback stressful, especially when it is negative. One-fifth of the managers avoid it entirely, which raises the question if our employees aren’t giving 100% to their work, can we, as managers, be at fault? Imagine dealing with an unproductive, unpunctual and irresponsible employee on your team who hasn’t been told about these traits yet. Picture him/her coming up to you and asking you for a raise? Shocking as it may seem, it is you who is at fault for not ever pointing out the worst.

Criticism, like evaluations, is an important aspect of being a manager. As managers, it is imperative that we understand the importance of giving and receiving feedback. Feedback, especially constructive feedback, is a respectful way of helping employees better themselves. It is a means of guiding them with honesty, directness, and dignity while not damaging their feelings and ego. When delivered in the right manner, it doesn’t create uneasy spaces within the four walls of the office but rather strengthens interpersonal bonds, which ultimately boosts the productivity and efficiency of employees.

The majority of managers find it hard to offer constructive criticism when it comes to pointing out areas of improvement. They struggle with finding the right balance between advising and criticizing, they fear their words might hurt the feelings of their employees, they worry if it will negatively impact their productivity by demoralizing them, etc.

But here’s a fact—you are going to have to get comfortable delivering constructive criticism. Really, really, really comfortable! Although it is hard enough to deliver it to anyone, it is the hardest when giving it to someone who always gets on your nerves or to an underperforming employee. To say the least, such situations require mastering the art of giving constructive criticism.

Therefore, in this article, together we shall learn how to give constructive criticism in a way that doesn’t hurt the receiver’s feelings as well as learn the differences between constructive and non-constructive criticism and how to use empathy to improve the impact of the criticism.

Dealing with Criticism

For many people, offering up criticism isn’t always pleasurable or appreciated, no matter if it’s from a family member, good friends or a work colleague. Whether it’s taken as constructive or it causes personal turmoil, criticism can be quite difficult to receive and process. The result can often be helpful if that was the intention, or it can be one of those difficult things to accept and forget.

Dealing with Criticism, written by Stephen Haunts

Being criticized at work has been known to have a significant positive or negative impact on employee morale and, in turn, productivity. Whether it’s handed out verbally, in an email, direct messaging systems or even a social media platform, more often than not, the one given the task of providing feedback, often fails to consider how it might be received, especially when it’s unfavorable. 

The goal is usually to improve results at work, without considering the connection between morale and productivity.

Some research has shown that criticism of any kind actually closes down the same brain centers that are otherwise activated when talking about positive things. So, it’s simple to understand how being criticized by a manager or colleague might evoke negative thoughts, embarrassment and humiliation. When a group of employees are put on the defensive and feeling dejected from negative performance reviews, it can be devastating to a company’s bottom line.

Receiving criticism at work, whether it’s called “feedback”, “performance reviews” or “advice”, likely won’t go away. As a cornerstone of corporate culture, more often than not, its how companies get things done. So, if your chances of avoiding criticism at work are slim, it’s in your best interest, as both giver and receiver, to understand what it is and how best to harness its capacity for productive output and positive people.

Creativity Through Limiting Choice and Embracing​ Constraints

Have you ever wondered how Picasso or van Gogh painted masterpieces on such a small canvas? How could they be so creative within such limited space?

Technology has come so far so fast that there’s little incentive to be creative with so many resources available. Sometimes those resources are so plentiful that they can be overwhelming. 

Think about something as simple as taking a picture of a child playing with a ball. Before the age of photo imaging, pictures were innocent, and with that innocence came creativity. The shot was snapped, and candid memories were treasured. Today, it’s hard to see a photo that hasn’t been altered in some way. There’s no need to worry about how the picture will come out because whatever is needed will happen with a computer and a photo editing program. 

Imagine taking a step back in time to when simplicity bred creativity. It can happen for you, and we’ll explain how.

Embrace Constraints 

Have you ever watched a toddler open a present on Christmas morning? So often, the contents, which are often toys, are tossed aside, and the child will stay occupied for hours playing with the box. My seven-year-old son still does this as he likes turning boxes into robots. There can be many shiny, new toys surrounding the child that remain untouched as the box is center-focus.

If all of the toys were removed, and all that was left was a large box, what would the child do? Most likely, they will climb inside and pretend it’s a truck, a spaceship, or even a robot. With or without many options, a child will limit his or her choice by choosing the most imaginative. 

Practical Techniques to Improve Your Self-Motivation

Lack of motivation is something most everyone has experienced at some time in their lives. We can often jump into action if we are prompted by someone else, but when it comes to self-motivation, we must be both the motivator and the motivatee. 

Practical techniques to improve your self-motivation by Stephen Haunts

This isn’t always easy, as we can be prone to procrastination and, let’s face it, laziness. True, we can be too lazy to do something we need to do. It’s so much easier to ask someone else or convince ourselves that it’s not worth the effort to perform a specific task or go to a particular place. 

I should write a book, but I doubt anyone would read it. 

I’d love to become an teacher, but going back to college… no way. 

The boss wants me to represent him at the award ceremony tonight, but I’d probably say or do something stupid.

I’m too tired to go to the gym today. Maybe tomorrow. 

Demotivators are continually looking for an excuse to avoid doing what they need to do to succeed, to reach their goals, or to simply do something or go somewhere. As shown in the above examples, there can be varying reasons for a lack of motivation. Whether it’s a headache or other physical ailment, a lack of self-confidence, or a lack of desire, you’ve probably been guilty of at least one instance of demotivation. 

We all have. And that’s why this article was written. We’ll explore some tips and techniques that will help you to get up and go, do the unthinkable, and conquer the world. 

Okay, so maybe you won’t conquer the world, but you can conquer your world. So, let’s get started!

Understanding Interpersonal Relationships

If you are interested in improving your interpersonal relationships at work but have always found it difficult, then you might like my Pluralsight course, Building Healthy Interpersonal Relationships at Work, where I talk about how to build, and maintain effective relationships, how to manage conflict and how to increase diversity and inclusion in the workplace.

Having a great day at work is one of the top ways to boost your mood and self-confidence. When things are going right in the workplace, you feel a sense of security that just cannot be duplicated elsewhere. Most of us need this type of workplace stability to become successful and productive. If you have ever felt that you love your job and you don’t mind the work involved, but there is still something out of place, consider the relationships that you have built with your coworkers. Interpersonal connections are essential in your daily life, and this includes your professional side.

Understanding Interpersonal Relationships by Stephen Haunts

When you work in an environment where you feel that you can be heard and understood, you are more likely to succeed. Those with hostile work environments tend to not only be more stressed out on an average daily basis but also find ways to take this stress out on loved ones or other uninvolved people. Getting along with your coworkers and supervisors can make all the difference between a great day and a terrible one.

Consider the way that you communicate with your peers. Is the interaction healthy? Productive? Do you feel that you lack something? This course is meant to help you dissect your interpersonal relationships at work while striving toward more robust connections. 

Self-Motivation and the Locus of Control

Motivation is not an easy topic for most people. In this day and age, procrastination runs rampant on the streets of society. We are raised to believe that the most natural path is the one that we should take and that we should use whatever means necessary to get the job done the quickest. However, what happened to the right way of doing things? What happened to our self-motivation? 

It is all too easy to get caught up in the fast-paced lifestyle that we live in today, and we often forget to ask ourselves the most straightforward questions. Why are we here? What are we doing with our lives? Are we enjoying the path that we are currently on?

I want to help guide you toward those answers, but to do so I need you to tap into what is known as your “Locus of Control.” Your locus of control is merely defined as 

“the capacity to which you believe you have complete control and power over what happens to you in your life.”

In layman’s terms, do you think that you have much, if any, effect on what happens in your life?

Julian Rotter is the psychologist who first came up with the term as he believed that a person’s locus of control varied by the individual. As Rotter hypothesized in his theory, the locus of control could occur on either an external spectrum or an internal one, and each person fell somewhere on that spectrum. Depending on where you find yourself on this spectrum of locus of control, your behaviors to your external environment will differ.

Overcoming Imposter Syndrome

Four years ago, my friend and I got leadership jobs in the same international company. The work was interesting and paid well. Often, our immediate boss appointed my friend to lead us in departmental tasks. My friend didn’t like that and complained about the responsibilities she’d been given, though she received praise for her work.

Nevertheless, my friend continued to insist that she was unhappy with the work, and even went so far as to say that she thought her leadership was a fraud and would be noticed one day. She claimed that some of us were more qualified and therefore should be doing the work instead. One time, she actually asked our boss, point blank, to remove her from a leadership role, stating that she didn’t feel qualified to lead this particular team. That very move, acknowledging her weaknesses, made her a leader in many eyes, but she still didn’t see it.  She just wasn’t aware of her competent leadership and result-oriented management. 

For one particular task, my friend did endless research and spent hours coming up with strategies. On consecutive mornings, we would find her in the office, compiling presentations. That moment spurred me to do some research and learn more about her mindset. What was driving her to think this way? Maybe I could help her learn to feel more self-confident in her abilities.

What I found was fascinating! I stumbled upon a psychological problem known as “Imposter Syndrome.” I studied various types, as well as strategies on how to overcome it. Later, I shared all my results with my friend and she had a significant breakthrough, learning to own her abilities and putting them to good use which much less fear.The following post details the information found during my research. I believe that the post here will go a long way to helping you better understand Imposter Syndrome. Furthermore, you will understand how it appears in different personality types and will learn how to cope with it.

Removing Mental Roadblocks from Your Work

If you found this useful, then you might also like my book on overcoming procrastination called, A Gentle Introduction to Beating Procrastination and Getting Focused, which is available as an eBook and paperback on Amazon.

Being creative in the workplace is not rocket science; it’s an achievable feat. Creativity in the workplace does more good to you than harm. It helps you make progressive flows in your work, enhances outputs and brings fulfillment to your work.  As profitable as creativity in workplaces is, some forces will readily prevent you from being creative in your work. These forces are called mental roadblocks.

Removing mental roadblocks from  your work
Removing mental roadblocks from your work

Mental roadblocks make it impossible for you to explore your creativity to the fullest, thereby hindering your optimum performance at the workplace. They also hinder your brain from making the right-thinking connections necessary for creativity. For you to have increased productivity through creativity, you have to deal with mental roadblocks. Dealing with mental roadblocks goes beyond the daily performance of routine tasks. In squarely dealing with mental roadblocks, you must face both the external and internal aspects of productive creativity. If you neglect the internal aspects in pursuits of the external aspects, you stay in the same spot of non-performance for a very long time. Productive creativity entails you deal with the internal issues – the mental roadblocks.

We shall travel this journey of dealing with mental roadblocks that hamper your productivity and creativity at work. When you deal with these mental roadblocks, nothing will ever slow you down from putting in your all and getting the best in your workplace.

%d bloggers like this: