Practical Tips for Talking at Usergroups and Conferences Part 1

Since becoming a Pluralsight author in July 2014, I have been working toward increasing my own personal brand. Part of this has been about getting out into the programming community and talking at User groups. I did my first talk in January of this year and have since done many talks. I was initially quite nervous about public speaking but I have enjoyed the process very much and I intend to increase the amount of talks I do in 2016.

Stephen Haunts talking at the Leeds Sharp Usergroup

Stephen Haunts talking at the Leeds Sharp Usergroup

I have learnt many things along the way whilst preparing and delivering talks so I thought I would write this post to talk about what I have learnt. If you have experience in this area and also have your own tips from public speaking it would be great to hear them in the comments for this post.

I have split this into two posts. Tips for before you deliver your talk, and the actual delivery itself.

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RabbitMQ Series Part 7: Getting Ready for Some Code Examples

Now that we have covered a lot of the introductory material for RabbitMQ, this part of the series will look at developing software to interact with the message broker as both a producer and a consumer. First we will take a look at the RabbitMQ client library. Then we will introduce the business scenario used for the sample applications. Before we start looking at the individual examples we will take a quick look at the common code shared between them. Then we will move onto the actual code examples themselves.

The code for this series can be found here.

These example will include:

  • Basic queues
  • Worker queues
  • Publisher and subscribers
  • Direct routing of queues
  • Topic based publisher and subscribers
  • Remote procedure calls

RabbitMQ client library

To develop software against RabbitMQ you will need to install the RabbitMQ client library for .NET.  Before we look at how to install the client library, let’s take a brief look at what it is. This series will not serve as an in-depth guide to the whole client library API. You can read a more in-depth document for the client library that explains the full library from the RabbitMQ site. This section will serve as an introduction to the library and the examples in the rest of this series will help you cement your understanding further.

What is contained in the Client Library?

The RabbitMQ .NET client is an implementation of an AMQP client library for C# and other .NET languages. The client library implements the AMQP specification 0-8 and 0-9. The API is closely modeled on the AMQP protocol specification with little additional abstraction, so if you have a good understanding of the AMQP protocol, then you will find the client library easy to follow.

The core API interfaces and classes are defined in the RabbitMQ.Client namespace. The main API interfaces and classes are:

  • IModel : This represents an AMQP data channel and provides most of the AMQP operations.
  • IConnection : represents an AMQP connection.
  • ConnectionFactory: constructs IConnection instances.

Some other useful interfaces and classes include:

  • ConnectionParamters: configures a ConnectionFactory.
  • QueueingBasicConsumer: receives messages delivered from the server.

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Getting Started with Microsoft Band Development

Fellow Pluralsight author Lars Klint has just released a recording of a user group talk he did in Denmark which was about the Internet of Things and more specifically getting started with the Microsoft Band.

As a band owner myself, I have been wanting to get involved with developing against this device to read sensor data now that I have started down the Universal Windows App road, and this talk give you a good introduction so that you can get started right away.

I highly recommend watching it.

You can get started on your Microsoft Band Development journey by going to the official developer site.

RabbitMQ Series Part 6: Basic Queuing and Message Example

In the previous article we looked at administering RabbitMQ from the command line. In this next article we will set-up a basic queue and also send and receive a basic message via the management portal.

Before we go and dive into some code and look at our samples, let’s work through a very simple scenario where we create an exchange and a queue and bind them together via the management portal. We will then send a message to the exchange and pull it from the queue. It is a very simple example, but it serves as a good introduction before we tackle some real world scenarios.

First of all go to the management portal and click on the exchanges tab. Once you are on the exchanges page, open up the ‘Add a new exchange’ section and fill it in as shown in the following screenshot. You will then need to click on the “Add exchange” button to add the exchange.

RabbitMQ Basic Queue and Message Example

RabbitMQ Basic Queue and Message Example

This will add a new ‘direct’ exchange to the list of exchanges. Now click on the Queues tab at the top of the page to go to the queue list. Open up the ‘Add a new queue’ section and fill it in as per the following screenshot. Now click the “Add queue” button.

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RabbitMQ Series Part 5: Administration via the Command Line

In the previous article we looked the Rabbit MQ management portal in more detail. In this article we will look at configuring RabbitMQ from the command line.

As well as using the web based management portal to administer RabbitMQ you can also use the command line (rabbitmqctrl.bat) interface. In this chapter we will demonstrate some of the basic features that you may need to use most frequently, but for a more exhaustive list of commands you can read the RabbitMQ manual page for the rabbitmqctrl.bat tool.

At a high level rabbitmqctrl lets you manage the run state of the message broker, manage your RabbitMQ clusters, administer users and permissions, manage policies and list exchanges, bindings, and queues.

Let’s work through a simple example of stopping and starting the RabbitMQ broker and checking the broker status.

Open up a command prompt and navigate to “C:\Program Files (x86)\RabbitMQ Server\rabbitmq_server-3.4.4\sbin

From the command prompt type:

 Rabbitmqctl status

You will see the following output in the command line window.

Configure RabbitMQ from the Command Line

Configure RabbitMQ from the Command Line

To stop the RabbitMQ broker from running you type the following into the command line:

 Rabbitmqctl stop

This will give you console output that looks as following:

Configure RabbitMQ from the Command Line

Configure RabbitMQ from the Command Line

If you run the status command line again by typing:

 Rabbitmqctl status

You will see that the RabbitMQ service has stopped. This will mean RabbitMQ will stop receiving and processing messages. If you have not setup durable queues and messages you will lose any messages already in the system.

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